The U.S.-China relations under the Biden Presidency and what are the workarounds

President Joe Biden’s friendship with China created the illusion that he would start healing the U.S.-China relations battered by President Trump. However, the cold reality of Washington politics has disappointed optimists on foreign relations.

The incoming Presidency will not reset the worsening bilateral relations because Biden’s China policy is subject to personal campaign premises, institutional constraints, and the strategic environment.

Not so China-friendly as you think

The loud voice of Trump’s anti-China rhetoric couldn’t cover Biden’s tough talks on Beijing. …


Though promising to restore and repair America’s relations with the rest of the world, three factors contributed to President Biden’s tough China policy.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Of course, climate change is one of the most important parts of President Biden’s priorities and he’ll need some help from China’s Xi Jinping. But Biden and Secretary of State Antony Blinken have reaffirmed many of the Trump administration’s most significant steps targeting China, including a determination that its crackdown on Uyghur Muslims and other minorities in western Xinjiang region constitutes a “genocide” and a flat-out rejection of nearly all of China’s maritime claims in the South China Sea.

Why the anti-China rhetoric hasn’t eased as the 2020 elections are over? …


Rivals and disagreements between Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders are beyond the COVID relief package.

Every new President has a hard time working with the Congressional opponents from the other party, as well as with a former adversary within the party. Now that Trump is gone, the electoral alignment between moderate and progressive Democrats’ goes to an end.

Photo by Mick Haupt on Unsplash

Senator Bernie Sanders, who was President Joe Biden’s major rival in the 2020 party nomination, offered his different opinion to Biden’s $1.9 trillion dollar COVID-19 relief bill.

Unlike the losses in 2016, the Democrats survived the division between moderates and progressives in 2020 and swept the Presidency, House, and Senate. …


On Day one, the Biden administration added three issues into its priorities. What the new White House priorities tell us, and why these changes?

Returning to some Obama-era policies won’t help Biden’s appeal for unity. | Photo by AronPW on Unsplash

Right after Election Day in 2020, President-elect Joe Biden began rolling out his transition plan, including a website “Build Back Better” listing four priorities for the start of his administration: COVID-19, economic recovery, racial equity and climate change. As President Biden sworn into office on January 20, 2020, the transition pages turned into the official White House website with three additional issues, health care, immigration, and restoring America’s global standing, being added to the priorities page.

The new priorities seek to reinforce and repair the wounds from his predecessors, show Biden’s personal issue positions, and reflect the restrained conditions facing…


Why Biden could mitigate the foreign policy challenges set by Trump

The Trump Presidency has made a profound departure from U.S. leadership in the world. Photo by Christine Roy on Unsplash

During the last weeks of the Trump Presidency, the State Department announced significant policies on Yemen, Cuba, Taiwan and Iran that sought to raise the stakes for Biden’s initial foreign policy plans.

“Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has made near-daily announcements of major foreign policy actions, many of which appear designed to cement Trump priorities and create roadblocks to new directions charted by the incoming Biden team.” — The Washington Post

Will those last-minute moves box in Biden on foreign policy? The short answer is no because Biden enjoys more presidential powers than Trump on foreign policy. …


How attack ads of Trump’s campaign contributed to political violence

The words and rhetoric of the incumbent President Donald Trump have incited violence throughout his campaigns and presidential term. The 2020 presidential election witnessed an unusual pattern of attack ads.

Disproportionate volume

A typical campaign ad can be categorized into one of the three kinds: promotional, contrast and attack.

Photo by Nicolas J Leclercq on Unsplash

During his failed 2020 presidential bid, the majority of Trump’s campaign rhetoric was prue attacks. According to a weekly study of the Wesleyan Media Project, over 60 percent of pro-Trump ads were pure attacks, and fewer than 10 percent were positive.


How the Trump supporters, the American public, and the international audience are misguided by President Trump

Referring news organizations as “enemy of the people,” President Trump thinks that he can govern by tweet. Today, Twitter locked his account for repeatedly violating its rules in posts about the Capitol Hill breach. The social media platform also warned that he will be permanently banned should he keep breaking the platform’s rules.

Photo by Jonathan Harrison on Unsplash

Wrong message 1: Inciting violence to his supporters

Since the start of his presidential bid in 2015, Trump has unleashed the rhetoric encouraging hate groups and political violence.

From CNN: “Hear what Trump told crowd before riot” on January 6, 2021, Washington, DC

The Guardian has compiled details of 52 incidents of “violence in…


What to concern in a vice presidential search?

Photo by Ronda Darby on Unsplash

In early March 2020, Democratic observers had started to speculate who will be Biden’s vice presidential (VP) choice, as Biden claimed to choose a woman as a running mate if he becomes the Democratic presidential nomination. Two criteria are believed to dominate the decision-making: electability and balancing. However, a wise choice of VP should take more factors into consideration.

The fallacies of VP qualification

Scholars and campaigners often stress that the presidential nominee should opt for someone who can help him/her with electability, whether appealing to a specific voting group, or boosting the chances of winning a key State. In Biden’s case, Sen. Tammy Baldwin…


To continue the US-China trade war or to reengage with China seems to be a tough question for the new administration.

The U.S.-China trade war, started in 2018, has caused economic pain on both sides. | Photo by Aaron Greenwood on Unsplash

Unlike the incumbent President Trump who aggressively attacked China during his campaigning and governing, the anti-China rhetoric by the President-elect Joe Biden appeared to be rare, responsive, and reluctant (though the silence didn’t hurt him much in the 2020 presidential election).

Related: Why the missing of “Spring Interregnum” didn’t hurt Biden in the 2020 presidential election?

“Republicans more negative than Democrats toward China, though unfavorable ratings have climbed among both parties.” — Pew Research Center

As tensions between the U.S. and China are escalating, should the President-elect Joe Biden follow the trend of public opinion and elevate his anti-China rhetoric?


  • During a “Spring Interregnum,” the presumptive presidential nominees enjoy time to heal the wounds, unify the party, and prepare for the general election campaign.
  • Avoiding in-person public appearance, Democratic strategists worried that Biden was ceding too much ground to Trump by staying home.
  • How did the candidate’s appearance and the media coverage affect presidential elections?
Photo by Drew Perales on Unsplash

In a typical election year, there exists a “Spring Interregnum” — a period when the candidates have clinched their party nominations while still be waiting for the national party conventions to kick off the general election race. No doubt that 2020 is an unusual year…

Xiaodong Fang

Political Scientist studied and worked at #Georgetown #IowaState #JamesMadison | Research and consultancy to advance knowledge and practice

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